Sonic Healing

Episode 14 November 15, 2020 00:42:45
Sonic Healing
More Happiness Less Suffering
Sonic Healing
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Show Notes

Lynda Arnold (AKA @divasonic) is a phenomenal sound healer and musician who has played on some of the largest global stages including SXSW, Burning Man and UNICEF events. Join us for a lively and honest discussion about how we all heal differently, and how sound can be a force for transformation, empowerment and connection.

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Episode Transcript

Speaker 0 00:00:00 Welcome to the more happiness, less suffering podcast. I'm Casey Howe, senior meditation and Dharma teacher for insight. Speaker 1 00:00:07 And I'm dr. Monisha Basa psychiatrist in our little podcasting studio in orange County, California. We bring wisdom from the couch and the cushion to your real life questions and struggles. So grab a cup of tea and join us. We're so glad you're here. Speaker 2 00:00:26 So welcome Speaker 1 00:00:26 Back everybody. Thank you for joining us at the more happiness, less suffering podcast, as always. We are so grateful to have you with us. And today we are really excited to introduce a guest, uh, to our listeners. Uh, we have Linda Arnold, uh, here with us today and Casey is going to share a little bit more about her, introduce her and, um, and then we'll get into a conversation. Speaker 0 00:00:56 Yeah. Thank you, Monisha. Yeah, very excited. We have Linda Arnold, a dear friend of mine. I'm also known as diva Sonic, and she is just so super incredible. She's a sound healer and musician. She has performed, um, at the Chopra foundation, Bhakti Fest LA live LA yoga expo South by Southwest lightning in a bottle, Bernie Mann lucidity festival. Desus to name a few. Um, she's, uh, really amazing. And I remember the first time that I actually experienced, uh, Linda, uh, I was at a soundbath at sacred roots and that's when the sound bath thing was just kind of getting popular and I didn't know what to expect. And she started playing these beautiful instruments and began to meditate and I was just digging and I was like, Oh, this is so cool. This is so awesome. And then, and then she started singing and how was like, what? I didn't even know that was part of it. I didn't know that the singing was, was part of it. And she literally has a voice of an angel like sakes, so incredible. And, um, and it's really healing like her presence, you know, when we meet somebody who is in the creative arts and they just have that, that it factor, they have it. And, um, Linda definitely has it. She has that ed factor. So welcome to the more happiness, less suffering podcast. We're so happy to have you thank you for, for coming. Speaker 2 00:02:40 Thank you, Casey. That, that, that's a wonderful intro. I appreciate that. And happy to be here with you. I really do admire your work and your consistency, you know, to the path of meditation and, and all that you've done. So I I'm just, I feel just as lucky and honored to be talking to you. Yes. Okay. So Linda Speaker 1 00:03:06 Would be great to, you know, for us and for our listeners to learn a little bit more about yeah. Your upbringing kind of where you grew up and how you found yourself on this path of music and sound healing. Speaker 2 00:03:20 All right. Yeah, absolutely. So I grew up, uh, on the East coast, uh, in East Hampton, um, and the end of long Island. And, uh, I grew up in a pretty, um, conservative Catholic households, um, a lot of structure I, you know, and, uh, but also a lot of fun and curiosity and, uh, I can safely say at this point in my life, you know, those were more innocent times, I would say, um, you know, no Ana, no internet, right? This is pre pre all the technology stuff. A lot of playing out in the woods, a lot of, you know, bike riding and going to the beach and, you know, just being in nature, which, you know, when you're growing up in a small town, all you want to do is go to the big city, you know, cause that's what the excitement seems, but then when you get older, you're like, ah, man, I can't wait to get back to the country. Speaker 2 00:04:12 So I dream of going back now. Whereas when I was growing up, I was like, Oh, hi, it was yearning yearning for more and more excitement. Um, but I did start a dance and music lessons at an early age and piano and flute really just jumped into the study of music. And, um, I felt pretty destined to go in that direction. And, um, I did classical training, uh, through college and then I kept studying, uh, post I did recording and engineering degree and I really felt there was something inside of me that needed to express myself artistically. Um, so, you know, post formal education, uh, which sort of, you know, I think went on too long for me. Uh, I needed the freedom to express something in a different way and that's really what evolved, um, through my twenties is, uh, writing and recording and, and, um, finding my sound and finding my way, um, and realizing just how difficult it really is, uh, you know, to trust yourself, knowing your own sound, your own vision and carry that through, um, from project to project. Speaker 2 00:05:27 So, you know, major growth, uh, you know, my, my, my parents always, especially my mom just would question why I'd want to do this, um, when I could do anything because she saw it as such a, um, an arduous path in some ways in the traditional way that we put music out there and try to sell ourselves that whole, uh, perspective on things. So, um, but I was had this, this tendency, I don't think it's just from, I wouldn't say it's from Catholicism or religion or religious school, and I did the whole thing, but I had this, uh, propensity towards, uh, spirituality and, and connection and psychology and, and, uh, all the different facets of the human psyche. And, and, and I, I just, there's a mystical part of it that I couldn't explain. And, um, I just really felt connected to that. And, and I think after studying, um, your sound healing, um, and around gosh, 2010, um, and starting to find teachers and do a program with still being a coach, um, there was a lot of aha moments within that where I actually got some answers or at least the door was open for me to express music in the way that I've always felt that it w you know, was true to me. Speaker 2 00:06:50 Um, so, so this really just changed my whole perspective and my whole path in terms of what I wanted to do and how I wanted to transmit sound. Um, so, you know, yes, I've become a quote, unquote, sound healer, uh, eating a sound, you know, sound meditation facilitator, or whatever. That's, whatever you want to call it. Now you go to sound baths. Um, but really what's so amazing and fascinating to me at this point, you know, after my whole journey of touching on different parts of the industry and disciplines within music is how, when people enter the space, they're there to listen and be quiet. And you're the awesome responsibility and excitement around how you can generate change in people's psyches through the sounds that you play. Um, so that has been like the best thing, um, you know, in terms of my own evolution, uh, as an artist and also as someone who is, you know, just I'm fascinated about the unseen, um, the, uh, the spirit and mysticism, and, and in turn how those things are starting to collide more and more with, with science, how we can measure these things, how we can measure the energy and how we can, um, affect people with intention. Speaker 0 00:08:17 Yeah, yeah. It's, it's incredibly transformative. And, you know, I was, I had the opportunity to, to bring in Linda to the mental health collective, um, here in orange County. And, um, it, it is a, um, it's a place that focuses on depression and anxiety, um, and mental health. And, and having you come in Linda and do a sound bath, uh, with these individuals and seeing, seeing that transformation take place, and they, they talked about it for months. It was like two hours. Right. And, and for as long as you know, there is, you know, some people that, you know, obviously eventually left the program and whatnot, but until they left, it was a real highlight, you know, further for their stay. And, um, like you mentioned, the unseen and, and science and whatnot. And it's like in meditation where thousands of years, like we know it works, but we don't know why. And I think that, that this sound healing, and we're probably on that precipice now of understanding, um, why the, why, you know, like science is starting to understand the why, like, we know music helps, right? Like we all turned on, you know, some form of music and sound and, and Phil feel more uplifted right by that. Um, and, and the why maybe we don't know, but it's, it's close, you know? Speaker 2 00:09:47 Yeah. I think there, there are amazing minds on it and, and new things are being researched and discovered all the time. And, um, you know, but I find myself gravitating towards, um, people like, uh, uh, dr. Bruce Lipton and, um, and Jeffrey Thompson who are using technology research biology, neuroscience to get into some of these, to, to search for these answers and, and to connect the different disciplines. I think that's where, where is that now is, is, is not just, this is separate from this. No, is everything is that these disciplines are connected. We can show and see how they're connected and, and why music works is because, you know, we have this electromagnetic system in our body and this nervous system, it needs to be adjusted. Uh, it needs tune-ups. And, uh, you know, sound is, is one way to do that. And, um, but it's funny, you know, at the, the mental health collective, you know, my experience as a facilitator is I really, even when I'm playing and I'm holding space, I see the struggle within the people, some of the people there, you know, they can't sit, they can't, it's hard, they're asking you to do something they probably don't want to do. Speaker 2 00:11:02 And then at the end, they're like, well, wait a second. Oh, Oh, I get it. That was, that was awesome. Okay. Yeah, you gotta do it again. So this time you can actually drop in a bit further and you can let go a little bit more and you can realize that your story doesn't define you let's make a new story. Yeah. So, and, and letting the sound and the frequency, um, uh, you know, assist you in that. Yeah. Yeah. Speaker 1 00:11:30 I also just think about kind of how in this sort of technology driven, you know, world that we're in, like these moments of just actually really intentionally slowing down and listening in a very specific kind of way I feel are. So it's so rare, like Casey and I were just talking about how, how we're taking information is so different these days, like with scrolling and just this distraction, and kind of, sort of very quickly jumping from one thing to another, um, that we don't often actually slow down in this way where we're really fully present and, um, settling in, um, and really receiving whether it's sound or other types of information on a deeper level. Um, and I think that there's something really beautiful about offering that to people, Speaker 2 00:12:23 Right? Yes. Because again, I mean, even for myself, um, I, you know, my meditation practice could be stronger, like when you have to show up somewhere and you have, there's no other home distractions around, and there's a container that's just meant for that for dipping into this, to just a space of sound and a practice, um, you're going to see results. And if you, you know, are, we're just trying to do it yourself, or, you know, you just don't have a good flow in your home space or wherever you are. It's, it's tough. You've got a family there, the kids are screaming, you know, they ha you know, they haven't done their homework and they're, you know, all that stuff, right. Oh, the kids is full of dishes and it is very, very tough cause we're all stuck at home right now, you know? And so, you know, boy, when this is pandemics over, like, we really do need these spaces, these studios to reopen these spaces to be open, uh, that, that can hold the container for, for this work. Speaker 2 00:13:28 Um, because we need each other, you know, the, the mind, the mind can be, you know, such a, it's a very crazy place, um, lot going on. Right. So we like, you know, we know that thousands of thoughts that we, that we have a day, or actually like the same, you know, like there's so much patterning and subconscious patterning and, and like part of, part of being conscious and being, uh, you know, dipping into your unconscious evolution is to start to observe those patterns. So you get to know them, not that they're easy to, maybe they won't go away entirely, but, but just to become an observer of those things, you know, um, it is really important. And they, you know, I know, you know, in order to shift them, right. So if not in them all the time, if we step outside and we're an observer, then we can actually actually see them as like an entangled, you know, globule of whatever thought form, whatever thought form. Speaker 2 00:14:27 You really need some thought form art. I think if somebody needs to get on this up, and then we can just use that, that form art. Um, uh, so, so yeah, when we can step outside and really see what those are, then we can begin to untangle them or, uh, changing it to something else or, or just know that they're there, but they're not the whole. And so with traditional meditation, I know some people have a hard time sitting in silence and, you know, I, I certainly was one of those people. I do have a story, uh, around that. Um, uh, but, uh, with sound, it's just a point of entry, you know, into a meditative space where people can just listen to this, of course, the vibrations and the sounds are powerful, but it gives people a chance, uh, to focus back in to the moment. Speaker 2 00:15:18 Right. And that's where you want people to be. So you can become that observer, um, of yourself. But, uh, I mean the first time I meditated it was, it was a disaster. So I went and it was, it shouldn't have been, but it was a public space as a public meditation. A friend of mine brought me to a Buddhist temple in Marin, up in the, in the Bay area. And it was a beautiful spot. And, um, there was a monk sitting there and the room was full. I mean, it was nice sat down. And I said, boy, what are we doing? You know, like, what is this my twenties? And, uh, my stomach was growling and I tried to close my eyes and I, I felt really uncomfortable. And the person behind me, I heard their stomach growl. And then it's some moments. I, it was so quiet. I was like, I can't. And I caught up and I tried, I had to leave, like I had to leave. So I got up and I went to the door opposite, the opposite, the person holding space. And we, um, the door was like, Speaker 3 00:16:29 No, no way, no way. Speaker 2 00:16:35 So I, I kind of, I rattled the door a little bit and that made a noise. And I was like, Oh no. And I, I turned around and that the monk gave me like a one I look serious look, and I just kind of went right past him, out the door. And I was like, okay. Speaker 3 00:16:51 Oh my God, that was so Speaker 2 00:16:57 Started. And I was like, wow, that I don't know about that. Like, yeah, I don't, I don't, I don't know about meditation, but here I am in my early twenties, when I was just trying to get started, I was dealing with the high anxiety, um, just, you know, and I'd never been in that space before, even though I'd been to church for many, many years, there was something different about that space. And I, and I hadn't learned about it yet. And, uh, it really just shows you, you know, where, um, most people may be with the practice of sitting with themselves. Yeah. And, uh, you know, I guess it's at 20 years ago now, you know, but, um, see we can all evolve, even though my, I don't think they, like, my mind is any less busy or I'm dealing with with, you know, uh, yeah. There's still some of those same things I deal with. However, the collection of the tools for transformation and objectivity, um, are the things that can really help you, uh, you know, except except the practice and, and, and, um, try it, you know, try the practice. Speaker 0 00:18:13 Yeah. Yeah. I, I love those stories. Know that's really real, you know, cause it's, it's just like a real people. Look at the people, meditating, they look all peaceful. I was like, man, that's not peaceful in reality, you know, points to that journey that you're talking about. I'm glad that she brought that up to where, you know, doing, like, talking about the mental health collective and, and performing there and seeing people that you know, are taking that journey. Right. It's the journey of, of meeting yourself and there's that tension there and you're meeting what you're struggling with. And then in the meeting with it, you're starting to understand it better. And along with some tools that are, that are becoming available and, and with the sound, um, assisting, seeing people go through that, that tension into the other side of it, you know, and we could do that in a session. We could do it in 10 years of practice. We're doing it continuously. We're still meeting those aspects of ourselves that are, are a little bit difficult. Right. We're taking that journey. Um, so it was, yeah, that's wonderful. The point of that, Speaker 1 00:19:19 I really appreciate Linda your honesty, because I think it's so relatable, you know? Um, and also just what you said that it, it doesn't mean that the struggles don't still exist. It's just that you're building that toolbox, you know, that gives you different ways of meeting those challenges. Um, but I think that's so important to talk about, you know, because I think that from the outside, you know, we can look at people who are, you know, in mental health or in mindfulness or in some aspect of sort of the healing, you know, and the healing fields. And there can be an inexorability to it like, Oh gosh, like they know something I don't know, or they have something I don't have, and I'm never going to be able to sort of reach that point. Um, sure. And so I think it's so important for those of us who are, who are in that space to say, Hey, we experienced the same things. You know, we struggle with the same things. We just are learning how to work with it and practicing just like everybody else, you know? And I think that's so important to, to share because it, it makes people feel less alone or it makes me feel less alone, I should say. Speaker 2 00:20:32 Oh, totally. Yeah. Yeah. In fact, you know, I, you know, I love talking about those like beginners, I had co beginner's mind stuff. So I come from just this aspect of beginner's mind. I think it's, uh, because there's always something to learn from everyone that you meet and from every situation. And, um, and, uh, and also the beginner's mind is also the mind of a child, the mind of an artist where you are constantly birthing new, new visions, you know, out of, out of the collective unconscious, collective conscious, whatever you want to call it. You're, you're, you're, you're designing and visioning, you know, a new form, a new something. So, uh, you know, meditation practice, you know, relating that to meditation practice when you, uh, you know, allow yourself to just like open up space in your mind, in your life for something new to come in, you know, that, that, that's where that's where the, the magic is. Speaker 2 00:21:36 Um, and, and, uh, and so that, that's why it's important, you know, and, and, and, you know, realizing there are different kinds of meditation. You do this walk there's movement, meditation, there's walking meditation. You don't have to sit all the time. You don't even have to, you know, you can walk with your sounds. So, so I think there is a practice for everyone in order to, you know, to get people, um, you know, back to them, back to themselves, back to their, you know, the essence of, of what they have to give to the world, you know, which these days I'm calling the diamond. Speaker 0 00:22:14 Yeah. And I know you also work one-on-one with people, and I think this might be something that, um, you know, people haven't heard about. Um, and I'm curious to know what kind of transformations you see with one-on-one clients. I happen to know some people that have worked with you and they just really, really enjoy it. Um, yeah. So what's that like, if somebody would work with a sound healer, give us an idea. Sure. Speaker 2 00:22:42 Well, there's a couple of different things that I, that I do. I do a private, um, sound, a sound bath with people. Um, cause I have Himalayan singing bowls that I got from my, from my teacher and I, I use, uh, a lot of different instruments, um, drums and chimes and tuning forks. And sometimes they bring in the bowl and I bring in some mantra and, um, or a flute or something. Uh, but the main part of the session is, um, is the true sort of enveloping of the sound. So, uh, I have people lay on the floor as to be closer to the vibrations. Um, and then I play the Himalayan singing bowls, different configurations around the body. And that just helps to move the energy, uh, vertical and horizontal and in different triangular positions, um, and, uh, for them to really listen and feel and, and integrate, um, you know, these tones, which are really soothing and relaxing. Speaker 2 00:23:42 And, and so I have a lot of people to me that, that, uh, you know, have, uh, anxiety or depression or they're, they they've gone through a surgery, you know, it could be cancer related or some sort of injury. Um, and, and then, you know, uh, there is emotional injury or people that have suffered, you know, verbal and mental abuse or emotionally going through a hard time going through grief because of a loss. And, uh, just like anyone going through all these things, you know, sometimes we just need to be held and supported and in the process of, of, of evolving, you know, from, from that state. So, um, I just play sounds that support that, uh, you know, starting with the Himalayan bowls for me being the primary way and then augmenting with different instruments and tones and, and tuning forks in mantra, the mantra will cause come to me. And then, um, I'll sing that mantra during the session and do a little bit of check-in in the beginning and then go into, um, into the session of listening. So we really want people to go deep and, and, and, and to let go, and just like in the group sound bass, it's the same thing, but here you're getting, you know, individual attention. And I do them in my studio at home where I have all my stuff, uh, um, I in the crazy scientist lab. Speaker 3 00:25:01 Yeah. That's so awesome. Speaker 2 00:25:06 And, uh, and then we just, we just do do the thing. And then, um, a more active way of doing a private session is through, um, my program devotional voice, which, uh, opens people's voices up for self healing and, um, vocal development. And so with a devotional voice, um, do a lot of breath release and vocal toning, which is singing vowel or seed sounds all the way out on the breath. Um, you know, for the best students that I have that are ongoing, uh, that, that stay with me for awhile, we get more into free singing. We get into, into Sanskrit mantra, medicine songs. And, um, I have a student now that I've had, I guess she's been coming for almost two years. I'm so blessed to have her. We're, we're really going deep into the Indian ragas now and singing ragas and exploring, um, Indian classical music forms and curtains and stuff. Speaker 2 00:25:58 So, you know, that's another way, it's a more active way, uh, to think of sound healing, but from a more like personal development approach. So you take tools with you that you can use, um, for yourself or even with your own groups or with other people. Um, and that's what my online program is about as well. And then sometimes I'll, I'll combine, um, you know, some breath release and toning with the sound healing session that I do for people to. Yeah. So I do integrate some of those things. Um, cause I feel like when people use their voice, you know, this is, we don't have to buy any instruments. Like we can just use that. And that is the most transporting instrument that we personally have, you know, getting people past this whole, like I was told to sing my throat chakra is blocked, you know, all that. So, you know, all those, all those things and, uh, and then allowing them to open up and without, uh, a stress or strain, but, you know, achieving freedom through, um, through the repetition of mantra or from, you know, long, long exhales on one note and one vowel on ah, or, you know, things that are, are super simple and without non-denominational and just sounds, so there really is no argument there then, you know, you can't argue with the sound. Ah, Speaker 0 00:27:26 Yeah, it seems so rich, you know, so rich and, and multifaceted and, and all the things that I can, it could work with. And I know we were talking before we went on with you, uh, about manesha and her journey into her new singing career. Um, yeah. She's going to be huge, massive, massive artists amongst him. Yeah. Speaker 1 00:27:53 I'm not sure about that, but yeah, I was telling Casey that during the pandemic I started taking, um, online singing, uh, classes, uh, singing lessons and, um, something I've never done before. Um, and it's been a really fascinating process just because it's one of these things where I feel like so much of what I've done over time has been so goal oriented, um, and focused on like also trying to be, you know, quote unquote, good at something. Um, and this has really been something that is not about an end result. It's definitely just about the process, you know, it's about letting go of like any self-consciousness, you know, that one might have about how you sound learning, how to use your voice in a way that feels comfortable. Um, and also just, yeah, not trying to get anywhere really, you know? And, um, and so it's been new for me and in all those ways, um, but I've really appreciated it. And I think it's been, it's been challenging because those are difficult things for me to, to work with. But, um, I really feel like it's helped me to grow in all those ways and to, to start shifting that focus away from the performative aspect of things and just, um, more sort of being in my own direct experience of it. Speaker 2 00:29:20 Yeah. That's so well said, everything you said is his thought on, you know, to, to, to the, to the work and, and, uh, the potential of, of, of just, you know, yes, loving your sound, using your sound, um, for yourself first, you know, cause you have to really embody that space and, and live that and know, and know the space intimately. And then, you know, you can, people will feel that there's a sense of like getting lost in it. So if you do like 108 mantra practice, um, or like a 15 minute toning practice where you sing home for 15 minutes with your eyes closed, you, you know, are really giving yourself a sound healing. Like when you wake up, you have sort of trans form and when you're always awake. But I mean, when you, when you complete the practice, um, you've gone somewhere like time has shifted spaces shifted you're you kind of got out of the linear focus of going from a to B and you've gone sideways a bit. So now you can go forward on a different track. Speaker 3 00:30:30 Yeah. No, that makes perfect sense. Speaker 2 00:30:34 So, so yeah. And so, so in that way, when you explain it, explain it like that, then it's really not just not about being a great singer and I'm a performer and I love performing, like I'm dying over here. Speaker 3 00:30:47 Can we get down there? Um, however, Speaker 2 00:30:50 Or, uh, I also know and appreciate this space, which is not about performing it's about inner work, inner resonance connection to your body. And, you know, as I do it, I just notice in times of stress and anxiety, how far away from it I get, and then I go back to it. I'm like, okay, it's like a reset button. And, um, and so we think about it like that, then, then the voice can be anything. It can sound like anything. It can be anything because it's really about, uh, the transmission of, of the intention through that medium. Speaker 0 00:31:36 For sure. Yeah. And I want, I don't want us to forget, I know you, you're mentioning to me that you finished your online course, which, uh, you've been working on for, for quite a while and Monisha and I have, we just finished sustainable caring our online course, and we know Speaker 3 00:31:53 How hard it is Speaker 0 00:31:55 To finish. And I'm selfless. I'm selfishly excited to, now that I could, you know, stair peop steer people your way from, from anywhere, right. Because you and I have known each other through sacred routes and like this more brick and mortar tangible place. And now, you know, things have really opened up and, you know, having these online courses and stuff, stuff is, I mean, it's really a gift to be able to share what we have to offer to anyone anywhere. So, um, yeah, before we end, I just want you to say a few words about, about what it is and what can people expect to find there Speaker 3 00:32:38 And how could find you and find you and find the course. Yeah. Speaker 2 00:32:44 Awesome. Yeah. I, um, I designed devotional voice course just from, you know, the so many sessions of, of working with people and, and, and working in the, in the groups and through my sound healing training, you know, the, the, the, one of the main facets of it was with Sylvia was, uh, the voice. She has a program called yoga of the voice, that's her, her program, and surely dips very, very heavily into raga and Brazilian ECOS and, and, um, and so very cross-cultural, uh, you know, ancient, ancient wisdom. And, um, and so I've carried that with me, you know, in developing devotional voice, uh, but making it accessible, um, and just kind of like having people dip in, in a way that's very clear and, um, you know, beginners again, beginner's mind, so, and anybody can start it. You don't have to be quote unquote spiritual. Speaker 2 00:33:38 You don't have to be a great singer. We already discussed that. It's really about using your voice for healing. So basically devotional voice, uh, the, the training that I have, um, on my website is, uh, four modules. So, uh, the first one is breath. So we, we talked about, uh, and practice some breath exercises, um, very simple things to increase, increase the power of your diaphragm so that these are, you know, a little bit more traditional voice, but we want to strengthen the diaphragm is a very yoga thing. Also, in order to have more breast supports, we can hold notes longer. The longer the out-breath, the more beneficial to the nervous system. So we do breath. We do, uh, vocal toning is the second module. As we start to use our voice and sing a note all the way out on the breath. And we, we explore, uh, Chuck fat, Tony, and, and then, uh, the third module is a free singing. Speaker 2 00:34:30 So, you know, it creating a, I provide practice tracks and, uh, there's some drones there, a little synthesizer Shooty background, and then you can really just float around and explore melody. And the fourth module would be a introduction to Sanskrit mantras and medicine songs. So then he starts to have actual tools to, um, to practice and, uh, re reading resources and things like that. And then, um, I just completed 10 Saturdays of, um, devotional voice sessions. So I, uh, on zoom. So I recorded all those, and those are up also within the course. Um, so they're full they're full practice sessions, like 45, 45 to 55 minutes going and I touch on each of the modules within each practice. So you can see how, like you can actually develop your own practice or lead a practice with those four aspects in mind. Um, and, uh, so that's that, that's where I'm at with it right now. Speaker 2 00:35:31 I'm excited. It's, you know, I, I offer a consultation session for people that just want to the video course, um, as they go through it, there's a couple of assessments there, so I can see people's progress as they move from beginning to end. And then, um, I also offer a package with, um, for private coaching sessions so that you can, I can kind of zero in on what, you know, uh, the person would like to work on specifically and expand, expand their knowledge, their, uh, so the, the, the courses on my website, divas, sonic.com, um, and, uh, there's a link to it on the homepage and also under education. And if you're on Instagram of diva, Sonica Instagram, and I have the link directly in my profile, uh, link tree. Um, so, and then people can always send me an email divas [email protected] if, uh, if they can't find it. Speaker 2 00:36:24 But, uh, but yes, I'm excited about that. I'm gonna be doing more and we're doing a native flute course and a sound meditation course. And so I'm going to be expanding my offerings, you know, over the next year. It's, uh, but like you said, Casey, it is quite a thing when you're, when you're, you know, making all the, doing everything yourself, right. Making all the videos and organizing the content. But what I love about it is that people can do it at their own pace. And, uh, I can get people through this sort of like introduction mindset and then meet them after they've gotten that, you know, foundation and, and help help people expand from there. Speaker 0 00:37:03 Wonderful. Well, that all sounds awesome. Yeah. I can't wait for our listeners to experience that. Um, thank you so much. Um, yeah. Wonderful having you, um, yeah, thank you. That's really, really wonderful. I'm so happy you're in the world and doing what you're doing. And like you said, like it takes all these different, these doorways, you know, to that, to the infinite, to the, to the stillness. And, um, and everybody has a different doorway at certain times, too, you know, when we're on the path for a long time, um, I, you know, for myself being, not being on the path and going from one modality to the next and really seeing what I needed at that time. And, um, and, and I see people going the other way, like people go from like, where I've been to, where I used to be, they're going to those, those paths and I'm going where they used to be here. Something, it doesn't matter. Like it's not like an evolution of this or that. Um, it's, it's all about us really being honest and with ourselves and paying attention to what we need and, and yeah. What you offers is so beautiful and amazing. So, so thank you again. Thank you for sure. And then, yeah, we'll just end with, uh, with a little meditation. Maybe you could join us, uh, as we sit a little bit Linda. Okay. Speaker 0 00:38:32 And if you're listening, like we mentioned, if you're driving a vehicle or something and close your eyes, but you get us, listen in allowing the words to fall, where they, where they may. And then maybe just honoring that as we've been talking about today, just honoring where you are in this moment, and maybe just <inaudible> meeting it with gentleness, repeating yourself, meeting the environment around you, eating your mind, your heart emotions with kindness, with tenderness, then staying with the energy of this kindness may be allowing to arise. Something that comes to mind that is kind, and it's something that you could do for yourself. What is something that you could do for yourself today that is kind might be having fun, listening to music. It might be cooking yourself a quality meal, just taking a few moments and being there for yourself and allowing the heart to expand and open thinking of others. May all beings be kind to themselves. Speaker 4 00:42:11 <inaudible> Speaker 0 00:42:16 May all beings everywhere with that exception. Speaker 4 00:42:21 Many I'll be happy and free from suffering.

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